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Ranchland

RANCHLAND – David Kimball Anderson

Opening Reception October 4th 4 – 6pm
October 3rd – November 3rd

Ranchland-installation-web-
 
 

The Great Highway Gallery is pleased to announce its fall exhibition Ranchland, featuring work by Santa Cruz–based sculptor David Kimball Anderson.

David Kimball Anderson Photo by Gigi Cosette Goldeen 2012

Photo by Gigi Cosette Goldeen 2012

In North Central Montana, where the annual rainfall is twelve inches, the cow to grazing acreage ratio required to properly raise cattle is forty acres per head. Although this ratio will vary depending on annual rainfall and native grasses, ranchland is vast by necessity.

Cattle walk miles for water. The utility of wind or solar pump and cistern is critical. The location of each is determined by the availability of ground water and not necessarily by convenience of access. These steel and concrete oases, singular places of gathering and relief, are distant outposts/destinations, strikingly visible in the expanse of sky and grass.
Another point of gathering on ranchland is the combined meeting place for roundup and animal husbandry where branding, vaccination, etc. and loading for market occur. During a less active season this might be the place of winter feeding or shelter.

These points in the landscape, the oases and the roundup and maintenance utilities, have distinct visual characteristics. They are where fences meet, where chutes are constructed and makeshift shelters house hay and tack. There may be a small camp trailer in the tight cluster. An old refrigerator on its back without its door may be in use as a feeding or watering trough. Rolls of fencing and stacks of fence posts add to the density of point in landscape. The oases more than likely will include a tree or clusters of Chamisa or scrub oak. Thanks to the overspill from the cistern and abundance of cattle manure the oases are generally plant-rich. Bees are frequent visitors. (A naked dip in clear cold water in a remote stone cistern on a very hot summer day is bliss.)

David Kimball Anderson Ranchland

Photo by David Kimball Anderson

I travel alone in the west frequently. I drive through many different ranchlands: dry and sandy Navajo; New Mexico with little more than Snakeweed for miles; Colorado highlands with knee-deep green grass and wildflowers; and Idaho where sunflowers are so abundant and rich it is nearly impossible to absorb the intensity of color. I stop at abandoned and active oases and utility camps. I record the structures. In the studio I build the structures.

We are very excited to present the new works of David Kimball Anderson. We will have more information soon. Visit David’s website to learn more about the artist.